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Elevator Technicians


Intro to Elevators and Elevator Technicians: Chapter 2


Elevator Technicians


By the end of this module, you should be able to describe the following:

Skills and Certifications required to become an Elevator Technician,

A day in the life of an Elevator Technician,

Your daily, weekly, and monthly duties as an Elevator Technician,

Other trades you can join after certification. Skip to quiz!


Required Skills to be a Technician


Elevator installers and repairers must have specific skill sets to succeed in their careers. You can learn most of the skills through apprenticeship and training. It may be helpful for you to know the skills required to decide if you are on the right track.


Many apprenticeships look for applicants with a working knowledge of some of these skills, so getting a head start can be advantageous. Elevator technicians performing design, construction, inspection, maintenance, or repair work on elevators must be licensed to work in most states, and optional certifications are available.


Verbal Reasoning and Physical Strength and Stamina are two soft skills required to become an Elevator Technician. Mathematics, Mechanical Aptitude, and Electrical Aptitude are the hard skills required to become an Elevator Technician.


You must know simple math to get into this trade. You must be able to convert decimals to fractions and fractions to decimals, as well as perform addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division operations.


We have a course that may help you learn simple mathematics. You can learn basic mathematics in the HVAC Trade Math Course on our platform.


You must have a good vocabulary. You must communicate properly with multiple parties, including customers, apprentices, managers, and many more. You must be able to explain or convey your ideas clearly and reasonably.


You must know about the Racks and Pinions, their possible rotations, sizes, speeds, velocities, pulleys, forces, loads, and torque. You must also know the proper usage of tools like Hammers, Screwdrivers, Wrenches, Pliers, Drills, and more.


We also have a separate course to help you learn the usage of tools. You can learn Key Hand Tools in the Mechanical Skills on our platform.


The job requires heavy lifting and hands-on assembly. You might have to climb into tight spaces and scale shafts as part of your job.


You can learn some skills in high school and others through self-study or undergraduate certificate programs. Besides, you can get an associate's degree in electrical engineering to learn electrical and mechanical skills.

It is not necessary to be certified. National Association of Elevator Contractors (NAEC) and the National Elevator Industry Educational Program (NEIEP) provide online access to the Division of Labor-approved certifications.


They have started 3 initiatives. They are:

  • Certified Elevator Technician (CET),

  • Certified Accessibility and Private Residence Lift Technicians (CAT), and

  • Qualified Elevator Inspectors (QEI).

Certified Elevator Technician (CET) is the basic certification program, and some apprenticeships offer it. Independent candidates may also apply if they can provide proof of training. A certification exam is required to obtain a certificate after this 4-year program.


Certified Accessibility and Private Residence Lift Technicians (CAT) use the same curriculum as CET but finish in two years. A certification exam is required to obtain a certificate after this 2-year program.


Last but not least, there is no educational program for Qualified Elevator Inspectors (QEI). Candidates for QEI must provide documentation of their training and previous work experience. You can only obtain QEI certification by passing an exam.


Elevator and Amusement Device Bureau enforces the Elevator Safety Act, which controls the installation, inspection, certification, and investigation of elevator and escalator accidents. ANSI and ASME are bodies that develop standards and codes that govern the industry.


OSHA is a body that regulates the safety codes in the industry.


Occupations


The occupations related to elevators are as follows:

  • Mechanic/Technician,

  • Installer, and

  • Inspector.

These positions ensure that elevators function correctly and all construction regulations are being followed.


When problems arise, a technician troubleshoots and performs maintenance on the elevator, dealing with mechanical or electronic issues. An installer installs the elevator cabin and connects the cables to the pulley. An inspector regularly visits the elevator and inspects its components to ensure its structural integrity and compliance.


You will work in a challenging work environment for 40 hours a week. You will have to work in a cramped workspace in awkward positions in high places at uncomfortable noise levels. You might be exposed to minor burns, cuts, bites, or stings.


Your daily duties as a technician would be:

  • Using hand and power tools to install, assemble, repair, and maintain escalators, elevators, moving sidewalks, and dumbwaiters.

  • Locate flaws in brakes, motors, switches, and control systems using testing equipment like test lamps, ammeters, and voltmeters.

  • Check that safety regulations and building codes are followed, and complete service reports confirming standard compliance.

  • Determine the layout of components, frameworks, and foundations, select installation equipment and read and interpret blueprints.

  • Inspect connections, installations, cabin, and Hostway alignments to ensure that equipment operates properly.

Your weekly and monthly duties as a technician would be:

  • Test new equipment to ensure that it meets specifications.

  • Connect control panels and electric motors with electrical wiring.

  • Adjust safety controls, door mechanisms, and components such as seals, brake linings, valves, and ratchets.

  • Repair or replace parts like locks, gears, cables, and electrical wiring.

  • Attach guide shoes and rollers to cabins.

A certified elevator technician can work in entry-level positions in various trades.

You can work in the following trades:

  • Telecommunications,

  • Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning Control Systems,

  • Computer Engineering Technology,

  • Renewable energy,

  • Automotive Electronics Repair,

  • Electrician, and

  • Electronic Sales.

Mathematics, Mechanical Aptitude, Electrical Aptitude, Verbal Reasoning, Physical Strength, and Stamina are the skills required to become an Elevator Technician. NAEC and NEIEP provide online access to the Division of Labor-approved certifications.


After certification, you can also work in trades like Telecommunications, HVAC, Computer Engineering Technology, Renewable energy, Automotive Electronics Repair, Electrician, and Electronic Sales.

 

Question #1: Which of these are regulatory bodies related to elevators? (Select all that apply)

  1. ANSI

  2. NTTO

  3. ASME

  4. SAE

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Answer: ANSI and ASME

ANSI(American National Standards Institute) and ASME(American Society of Mechanical Engineers) develop standards and codes that govern the elevator industry.


Question #2: Which of these are regulatory bodies related to elevators? (Select all that apply)

  1. Mechanic

  2. Actor

  3. Installer

  4. Inspector

Scroll down for the answer...
















Answer: Mechanic, Installer and Inspector

The occupations related to the elevator industry are:

- Mechanic/Technician,

- Installer, and

- Inspector.



Question #3: On which of these does an elevator technician work?

  1. Elevator

  2. Automotive

  3. Escalator

  4. Dumbwaiters

Scroll down for the answer...
















Answer: Elevator, Escalator and Dumbwaiters

An elevator technician works on the following:

  • Elevator,

  • Escalator,

  • Sidewalks, and

  • Dumbwaiters.

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